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Backup – what backup?!

I remember when my first child was born; it was also the time when digital cameras we’re gaining popularity. I took a lot of photos around that time and saved them all to my PC over a USB cable connection. All well and good. Some time later the same year we moved house and I decided to backup all of my data, including photos, to DVD. In total there was enough data to fill 5 DVDs so I made a fresh coffee and got to it. Around the end of DVD # 4 I received a phone call. Not the most dedicated when multitasking (OK I’m really bad at it!) I simply can’t remember burning that final DVD. I know I did it, but the final process after each disk ‘burn’ was definitely not done – the error check. This would have shown me, in no uncertain terms, that the 5th DVD of 5 had not in fact burned very well at all; every file on that final DVD was totally inaccessible. Bummer. It was a particular disaster as most of the photos from the first few months of my eldest child’s life was on the last disk and they we’re all now gone ( the PC got wiped). The DVD was now best suited to use as a quirky geek’s coaster.

The above, whilst feeling like a disaster at the time and a bit of a pain looking back, is not the end of the world. I had emailed a few of the photos off to friends and family, so I could conceivably get those back at least. It would have been a lot worse had all my backed up data been corrupted, or lost.

These days, with the advent of super fast broadband and very cheap disk space, there really is no need to lose any data. If you have under 15 GB (Gigabytes) of photos and other files, you would be free to use Google’s ‘Drive’ software for free and have all your files backed up, or more precisely, ‘synchronised’,  with Google’s online storage servers. There are arguments for and against using Cloud storage and I’m not going to examine those in this article. Save to say, if you’re happy for Google to hold your data on their systems then your data will be held on one of the most reliable and secure systems in existence.

Using this service, any data you keep in your ‘Google Drive’ folder on your laptop or other computer will be synchronised with another computer somewhere else. Somewhere out of harms way; somewhere you can access again from another computer if anything terrible should happen to the current one. Laptops can fail, be stolen, fall in the bath, off a desk or get drenched in coffee. It happens. Using a Cloud synchronisation service (and there are many, many to choose from out there not just the Google offering stated here) you can keep your data safe in an ‘up to the minute’ and effortless kind of way.

If you’d like any more info or some help setting an online or any other more suitable to you backup, drop us a line or call the shop. We’d be delighted to help.

 

R

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